Course Number
 
Description and Objectives
Quarter Hours
   

Foundation Courses

 
       

BUS 500

 

 

Foundations of Accounting and Finance

4

   
Part I:
 

 

 

 

 

Accounting is an information system which provides useful information to its users. An introduction to accounting; provides both theoretical foundation and applications of accounting. The accounting model and information processing cycle are developed. The content of the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows are studied and analyzed. The topics also include internal control, cash management, and the accounting aspects of bonds and stocks.

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Part II:
 
   

Finance will introduce students to the basic tools of financial management. The students will have an opportunity to diagnose the financial health of a firm. In addition, students will also be introduced to other important concepts such as valuation, risk and return, cost of capital, and capital budgeting. The course also examines fundamental drivers of a firm's financial policy. (This course will be waived with a "B" or better grade in ACC 300 and FIN 300, or equivalent. This is an accelerated course on the foundations of accounting and finance.)

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BUS 501

 

Economic Principles

 4 

 

 

 

This course examines economic principles with emphasis on their applications to business decision-making. Topics include market analysis (supply and demand), price elasticity, profit maximization, market structure and the firm's output and pricing decisions. The course is also an introduction to probability theory and statistics, and their application to data description and analysis. Topics include data description using graphs and numerical measures, probability and probability distributions, estimation and simple linear regression. Emphasis is placed on the application of these techniques to practical business problems through the use of standard statistical software. (This course is waived with a "B" or better grade in SSC 304 or equivalent and a "B" or better grade in MAT 320 or equivalent.)

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CIS 500

 

Foundations of Computing

 4

 

 

 

 

This is a foundations course for two of the key areas of undergraduate computer science education: web development and database development. Knowledge of both areas is required for client/server development, a key component of graduate education in the computer field. The web development part of the course focuses on tools such as HTML, JavaScript, PHP and CSS to teach students to design and implement a user-friendly website for a real world business. The database development part of the course focuses on the principles of relational database systems and in-depth hands-on skills in SQL. SQL is the command-based language of database development and students will create databases, form complex queries of the data, and generate data reports. (This course will be waived with a "B" or better average in both CIS 208 and CIS 290 or equivalents.)

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Graduate Courses

 

ACC 510

 

Accounting for Managerial Decisions

 

4

 

 

 

 

This course includes a study of managerial accounting topics through the use of case studies involving a wide variety of management issues and concerns. The course will enable the students to understand how accounting information, can be used to facilitate decision making, performance measurement, and control. Students will analyze and use data to gain strategic advantage. Analytical techniques and communication skills will be emphasized, including: break-even analysis; budgeting; profit-planning; and variance analysis. Internal control and ethical decision making will be discussed. (Prerequisite: BUS 500)

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ACC 520

 

Fraud Prevention and Detection

4

   

This class focuses on an exploration on how and why occupational fraud is committed, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, and how allegations of fraud should be investigated. Topics will include the examination of the legal elements of fraud, information security, fraudulent transactions, financial statement fraud, forensic accounting techniques, procedures of fraud investigation, and corporate ethics. Special attention will be given to the provisions of Sarbanes-Oxley ACT of 2002 as it relates to internal control and the AICPA's SAS 99 provisions for fraud detection. (Prerequisite: Accounting concentration only)

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ACC 560

 

Advanced Auditing

4

   

This course is a continuation of basic auditing. This course will review the objectives, internal control procedures and operating cycles for such activities as Accounts Receivable, Revenues, Inventories, Property, Plant and Equipment, Accounts Payable, and Other Liabilities. A review of statistical sampling for evaluating test controls and substantive tests for an audit plan will be discussed. (Prerequisite:  Accounting concentration only, ACC520, ACC571 and FIN525)

 

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ACC 571

 

Government Accounting

4

   

This course will involve the financial reporting applicable to state and local governments and not-for-profit entities. The Fund Accounting will review such areas as: operating activities, general capital assets, general long-term liabilities, debt service, business type activities and fiduciary activities. The analysis of revenue and expenses at government-wide level, government fund budgets and operating statement accounts.  (Prerequisite:   Accounting concentration only)

 

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DES 510 

 

 User Experience Design

  4

   

Students apply theories of human-computer interaction and consumer psychology to the creation of mobile and web-based applications. Information workflow, usability testing, and research protocols are applied to create a seamless experience in which the user's interaction with the device becomes as simple and efficient as possible. This course integrates programming and graphic design with an eye to creating a functional and aesthetic, commercially-viable product.

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 DES 520

 

 Interactive Media Production Studio

 4

   

This course further develops professional-quality mobile and web projects. The creation of advanced interactive applications utilizing video integration, animation, and graphics are an integral part of this course. Students manage client-based projects using a team approach simulating a working Design & Media studio.(Prerequisite: DES 530 Design Concepts for Mobile Applications)

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 DES 530

 

 Design Concepts for Mobile Applications

  4

   

The key concepts in designing and deploying a mobile application and mobile website are studied. Students apply both programming languages and the latest software tools to the creation of mobile apps with cross-platform capabilities. Students work in design teams to develop, test, and evaluate mobile applications. Project management, timelines, and deliverables are based on real-world case studies.

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DES 540 

 

 Video Integration

 4

   

Video creation, acquisition, and non-linear editing concepts, principles, and techniques are examined. Students will develop a critical understanding of the roles of producer and designer by developing a multimedia production from concept to finished product. Students work in a team environment during the pre-production and production process, finishing with project integration into various interactive media.

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DMM 510

 

Multimedia Production Management

 4

   

This course examines the management of complex technological workflows integrating multiple media for strategic campaigns in print, online, television, radio, and mobile media. Students explore the responsibilities of a multimedia producer including staff management, marketing, managing budgets, and client relations.

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DMM 520

 

Film and Video Production Management

 4

   

The producerís role in film and video production is analyzed via simulation and actual production. Budget management, locations, scouting, casting, scheduling, contracts, hiring crew, and managing all aspects of a successful film and video from pre-production through post are investigated.

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DMM 530

 

Gallery and Studio Management

 4

   

In this course, students examine management and operations related to the exhibition of artworks in public, private, and alternative venues. Students evaluate artists and their work for inclusion in profit and not-for-profit enterprises. Exhibit jurying, production, and marketing strategies are explored and analyzed.

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DMM 540

 

 Entrepreneurship: The Successful Design Practice

  4

   

In this course, students develop sustainable business models for the leadership of design organizations. Strategies for client generation, studio management, profitability and team management will be examined and applied via simulations and case studies. Students generate a business plan for the startup of a small to mid-sized design firm.

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DMM 585

 
 

Graduate Internship for Design and Media

2

   

The graduate internship for Design and Media is a capstone experience intended to help students integrate coursework with the practice of administration and to reflect on their own development as professionals.  Students work under the supervision of university faculty and a cooperating administrator at the internship site.  (Prerequisite: completion of Design and Media specialization courses and Dean's approval, MM Design and Media specialization only)

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ECN 510

 

Managerial Economics

4

 

 

 

 

A study of the economic theory and applications relevant to business decision-making. Topics include supply and demand analysis, consumer elasticity, the theory of production and cost, profit maximization and marginal analysis, the theory of the firm in different selling and hiring environments, and the economics of personnel and compensation. Through research and case study, students will analyze such business decisions as production, pricing, non-price strategy and employment. (Prerequisite: BUS 501)

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EDT 510

 

E-Learning Strategies: History, Theory, and Trends

4

 

 

 

 

This course provides a historical background and current trends in online learning. The impact of e-learning theory, learning management systems, and web-based technology tools on instructional design are explored. Potential ways technology can be implemented to address various learning theories are considered to aid in designing and interacting with e-learning programs.

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EDT 515

 

E-Learning Strategies Utilization

4

 

 

 

 

Using a variety of educational software, students will discover e-learning best practices and create discussion forums, online surveys, quizzes and e-portfolios for successful teaching online. Students will also ascertain the impact of social networking tools on teaching and learning and how to deliver content using specific media (blogs, wikis, podcasts, webcasts, etc.).

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EDT 520

 

Blended and Online Learning: Technologies and Assessment

4

 

 

 

 

Using technology as a catalyst for assessment, students will explore how assessment strategy becomes the foundation for developing the instructional design of blended and online courses. Students will explore various assessment tools to analyze and assess for achievement of learning outcomes, while providing a diverse array of methods that reflect student understanding.

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EDT 530

 

Facilitation and Communication Utilizing E-Technology

4

 

 

 

 

This course helps students gain an understanding of how to facilitate and build an e-learning community in both blended and fully online courses. Course topics include asynchronous and synchronous communication technologies, facilitating group projects in the online classroom, and facilitating online class activities using problem solving scenarios, simulations, and online discussions.

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EDT 540

 

Creating a Mobile Learning Environment

4

 

 

 

 

This course will explore learning design, content, and critical factors to consider for successful application in a mobile environment. It will help educators and trainers develop effective pedagogy and instructional strategies that capitalize on learners' interest and access to mobile technology and use that familiarity to meet learning, professional development and training goals. In this course, students are expected to develop a web-based learning environment using a learning management system to manage the instructional process effectively. (Prerequisites: EDT515, EDT520, EDT530)

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ETM 500

 

Strategic Management of Educational Technology

4

 

 

 

 

Through case study research, critical leadership and management tasks are identified regarding the integration of technology at educational institutions. Strategies for the coordination of different support units, such as IT support, teaching and learning labs, or libraries, are explored. Students design a coordinated workflow to motivate faculty, assist support units to overcome cultural differences, and provide reward and support structures to manage the integration process.

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ETM 520

 

Measures and Analyses Utilizing Longitudinal Data Systems

4

 

 

 

 

This course examines the use of educational data to monitor system performance and student learning along with best practices for conducting education research with longitudinal administrative data. Students will learn techniques used to leverage the power of existing administrative data to evaluate the effectiveness of instructional materials, strategies, and approaches for educating different types of learners.

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FIN 520

 

Corporate Finance

4

 

 

 

 

This course overviews advanced topics in financial management with particular emphasis on working capital management, dividend policy, investment banking, mergers and acquisitions, and pension plan management. Study financial aspects relating to a corporation or a not-for-profit entity. Through the use of case studies as well as corporate research, students will make financial decisions for an organization analyzing the alternatives and their effects on all stakeholders, and respond rationally to change. (Prerequisite: BUS 500)

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FIN 525

 

Investments Analysis

4

   

This course is designed as an introductory graduate level course on investments and security analysis. It will provide a thorough study of financial markets, valuation techniques, asset allocation issues, risk and return, indirect investing, top-down analysis for investment decisions, and other financial instruments such as derivatives. The course also discusses an analysis of bond markets and bond duration, fundamental analysis, modern portfolio theory, and evaluation of investment performance.  (Prerequisite:  Accounting or Accounting/Finance concentration only)

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FIN 620

 

Money, Banking, & Financial Markets

4

   

This course examines the essential elements of money, banking and financial markets. The emphasis is on macroeconomics including forms and functions of money, financial markets, the role of electronic trading, interest rates, efficient markets, depository institutions and regulations, money supply, central banks, the role of the Federal Reserve and monetary policy.  (Prerequisite:  Accounting/Finance concentration or Management/Finance concentration only, FIN520 with a grade of "B" or better)

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FIN 680

 

Security Analysis & Portfolio Management

4

   

This course is specifically designed to prepare individuals for the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) exam, level one. The course focuses on the tools and input for investment valuation, especially statistical tools and financial statement analysis, fundamental analysis, asset valuation, portfolio and financial instruments.  (Prerequisite:  Accounting/Finance concentration or Management Finance concentration only, FIN520 with a grade of "B" or better and FIN525)

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FIN 690

 

Advanced Topics in Finance & Investments

4

   

This is an advanced, case-based, corporate finance course with an emphasis on valuation, mergers, and acquisitions, capital structure, debt management, and dividend policy. Topics include optimal capital structure, IPOs, mergers and acquisitions, optimal payout policy, working capital policy, contemporary issues in corporate finance, and corporate governance. (Prerequisite:  Accounting/Finance concentration or Management/Finance concentration only, FIN520 with a grade of "B" or better, FIN525, FIN620 and FIN680)

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HCA 521

 

Leading Contemporary Health Organizations

 4

   

This course will analyze the application of effective leadership tactics for multidisciplinary teams to deliver quality health care services within the constraints of care resources.  Contemporary readings on a variety of health care delivery issues and use of simulations and case-based projects are included.  The course will provide enhanced knowledge in areas including analysis of revenue cycles and reimbursement, purchase of technology, system-wide preparation for regulatory requirements, emergency management, staff recruitment and development.  (Prerequisite:  MM HCA specialization only)

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HCA 555

 

Do No Harm:  Social Ethics in Health Care

 4

   

This course analyzes current regulatory, risk management, and legal issues facing health care administrators. Historic and current legal cases will be analyzed. Current and emerging state and federal regulatory guidelines will be applied to a variety of case studies. Topics related to bioethics, public disclosure, sentinel events, root cause analysis and ethical dilemmas unique to the health care delivery system are examined. (Prerequisite:  MM HCA specialization only)

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HCA 585

 

Graduate Internship for Health Care Administration

2

   

The graduate internship for Health Care Administration is a capstone experience intended to help students integrate coursework with the practice of administration and to reflect on their own development as professionals.  Students work under the supervision of university faculty and a cooperating administrator at the internship site.  (Prerequisite:  75% completion of HCA specialization courses and Dean's approval, MM HCA specialization only)

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HCA 602

 

Transparency in Outcomes:  Applied Performance Measures

 4

   

This course examines statistical methods used by health care administrators to create effective performance improvement programs that evaluate quality of care and facility outcomes. Emphasis will be on the use of data collection, medical informatics, reimbursements trends, point-of-service experience, and outcome measures. The course will provide opportunities to create and present a variety of dashboard indicators and performance metrics models used in administrative decision-making.  (Prerequisite:  MM HCA specialization only)

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HCA 603

 

Applying Cost/Benefit Drivers to Strategic Decisions

 4

   

This course provides an examination of the scope of relevant funding and revenue sources for health care delivery in both for-profit and non-profit environments around the globe.  An in-depth investigation of a variety of third party payers and payment systems will be explored as well as processes health care systems use to ensure reimbursement, self-auditing and recovery from denial of payment. In addition, students will research funding resources such as clinical education funding and clinical research funding.  The interaction of costs/benefits and quality is explored.  (Prerequisite:  MM HCA specialization only)

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HEA 535

 

Organization & Governance in Higher Education

 4

   

Organizational aspects of institutions of higher education are discussed with emphasis upon governance structure and the process for making major policy decisions. Course content will include accreditation, the four primary organizational frameworks and their implications for administrative practice, leadership, and change within an organization.  (Prerequisite:  MM HEA specialization only)

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HEA 538

 

The 21st Century College Student

 4

   

This course will examine how social contexts (e.g., cultural and economic) shape individual intellectual and personal learning preferences and goals. A wide range of literature that discusses the varied experiences of students of different ages, ethnic backgrounds, genders, disabilities, and sexual orientations will be reviewed. This course provides exposure to the many often-complex issues that students face and perspectives regarding how these issues impact student learning and persistence, thus providing an opportunity to explore how educators and administrators might resolve these issues.  (Prerequisite:  MM HEA specialization only)

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HEA 544

 

Program & Curriculum Administration & Assessment

 4

   

This course examines both traditional and emerging models of curriculum and evaluation. Historical and philosophical foundations are combined with current strategies in order to provide an understanding of recurring debates that have shaped American higher education. Current practices in undergraduate curriculum as well as formative and summative assessment methodologies enable students to translate findings into practical implications that inform practice, policy, and institutional progress.  (Prerequisite:  MM HEA specialization only)

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HEA 585

 

Graduate Internship for Higher Education Administration

2

   

The Graduate Internship for Higher Education Administration is a capstone experience intended to help students integrate coursework with the practice of administration and to reflect on their own development as professionals.  Students work under the supervision of university faculty and a cooperating administrator at the internship site.  (Prerequisite:  75% completion of HEA specialization courses and Dean's approval, MM HEA specialization only)

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HEA 601

 

Issues in Higher Education Impacting Longitudinal Planning

 4

   

This course explores the vast array of issues directly impacting American higher education and analyzes how they provide both opportunity and challenges in the development of long-term plans.  (Prerequisite:  MM HEA specialization only)

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LEA 510

 

Critical Issues in Law Enforcement Management

4

   

Law enforcement administrators are faced with increasing challenges in managing and leading todayís criminal justice organizations. Recent surges in terrorism, cyber crime, and gang activity have complicated the role of law enforcement agencies. Students will apply practical and innovative approaches to managing the complexities facing agencies and officials. Media relations, effective negotiation skills and personnel management will be covered.

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LEA 525

 

Technology in Security & Law Enforcement

4

   

As public and private agencies are increasingly expected to collaborate, technology continues to play a key role for law enforcement and security practitioners. This course explores the functions of private security in sectors such as retail, computing, transportation and banking. An overview of security systems used in both public and private agencies will be examined in addition to the legal framework governing security operations. New and emerging technologies will be surveyed as they become available.

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LEA 540

 

Emergency Management & Homeland Security Practices

4

   

Students will examine the major policies, practices, concepts and challenges confronting key players involved in the complex field of Emergency Management and Homeland Security Management. The course provides an overview of various threats to domestic security from terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, and other related risks and vulnerabilities. The course will examine federal, state and local response procedures including strategies, technological advances in law enforcement/security and systems involved in protecting against and responding to these threats. Focus will include the managerial, political, legal and organizational issues related to crisis planning and response by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the National Incident Management System, Federal Emergency Management Agency 

 

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LEA 550

 

Crime Prevention & Control: Current Practices & Ethical Considerations

4

   

This course addresses the ethical and moral dilemmas that face law enforcement practitioners in preventing and controlling crime. Juvenile and adult practices in corrections including incarceration, probation, parole and community corrections programs will be analyzed in terms of effectiveness and social responsibility. The social, political, economic and organizational factors affecting correctional policies along with recent development in alternatives to incarceration will be discussed.

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LEA 560

 

 Social Justice & Professionalism in Law Enforcement

This course explores professional ethics applied to law enforcement administration including cultural diversity, racial biases and minority relations. Students examine the philosophical origins of ethics and the relationship of ethics to law and the concept of justice. General ethical propositions are established and applied to specific issues in law enforcement to educate students about ethical decision making and to assist students in becoming personally responsible in their professional careers.

 

 

LEA 570

 

 Law Enforcement Administration and Management

This course will be a study of Law Enforcement Administration and Management with an emphasis on the application of sound managerial concepts and techniques.  This course will explore the functions of managing a police organization in the 21st Century, with a focus on theories and procedures of general management practice. Topics include personnel roles and functions, issues and practices, rights of employees, labor relations, financial administration and administrative practices and principles. The class will relate the actual situation of the application of the general concepts with an emphasis on leadership.

 

LEA585

 

Graduate Internship for Law Enforcement Administration

2

   

 The Graduate Internship for Law Enforcement Administration is a capstone experience intended to help students integrate coursework with the practice of administration and to reflect on their own development as professionals.  Students work under the supervision of university faculty and a cooperating administrator at the internship site.  (Prerequisite:  75% completion of LEA specialization courses and Dean's approval)

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MGT 505

 

Ethics and Communication

4

 

 

 

 

This course explores vital management, ethical and communication issues in today’s business environment. Students develop skill in communicating among internal and external constituents, composing effective professional correspondence and presentations, facilitating discussions, negotiation and making responsible decisions. Students will exercise these skills through research, debate, negotiation, role-play and presentations.

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MGT 508

 

Research and Statistics for Management

4

 

 

 

 

This course applies statistics to practical business situations. Students will make and support decisions based on responsibly manipulated statistical data, data analysis, probability, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, correlations analysis and multiple regression models. Emphasis will be placed on the application of these techniques to practical problems in business through the use of standard statistical software. (Prerequisite: BUS 501)

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MGT 530

 

Strategic Human Resource Management

4

 

 

 

 

The course examines the interaction of human resource management with business policy and competitive strategy. Examination of functional HR tools and practices of HR management to broader business issues will underscore how a firm’s approach to managing its human resources can enhance or detract from overall effectiveness. Issues such as employment law, labor relations, training and development, recruitment and placement, employee retention, and compensation and benefits will be explored from a strategic standpoint.

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MGT 540

 

Managing Diverse Organizations

4

 

 

 

 

Students will learn to recognize diverse points of view and appreciate the many ways that a diverse workforce can enhance an organization's effectiveness, improve work relationships, and maximize both individual and group contributions. Through guest speakers, media, and cases, students will have the opportunity to explore attitudes about all aspects of diversity including race, gender, religion, sexual preference, age disability, and culture. Sources of power, influence, culture and ethics will be analyzed for their affect on an organization. Students will examine advanced managerial and leadership principles to improve work relationships with both individuals and groups in a multicultural society.

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MGT 545

 

Leadership Practice & Theory

4

   

This course examines leadership concepts and theories underlying relationships with the leader, followers and situations. Through various evaluative instruments, students will analyze their own leadership styles and competencies and receive feedback on observable behaviors and styles. This course further examines some of the most pressing issues facing today’s organizational leaders. Using a systems perspective, students will examine contextual and operational issues such as social responsibility, ethical climate, diversity, globalization, performance measures, and strategic planning that challenge today’s leaders. Through extensive readings, discussions, individual and group projects, students will develop a comprehensive leadership perspective, an appreciation of the complex leadership environment facing contemporary leaders, and a sense of their own abilities for future success.

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MGT 550

 

Organizational Design & Change Management

4

 

 

 

 

This course will focus on the assessment and alignment of organizational strategy, structure, technology, size, culture, and their effect on organizational change.  Through case studies and discussion, students will analyze the fit between enterprises' internal and external environments. Students will review and evaluate change strategies, including initiating change, gaining commitment, overcoming resistance, and maintaining momentum to improve the effectiveness of work groups and organizations.

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MGT 555

 

Legal Issues in Human Resource Management

4

   

This course examines the various Federal, state and local laws, regulations and executive orders as they affect the human resource function including equal employment opportunity, affirmative action, wage/overtime payment, employment agreements, union-management labor relations, employee rights and other restrictions on management actions.  Emphasis will be placed on maintaining compliance with these laws and developing proactive practices to avoid costly litigation.  

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MGT 556

 

Compensation & Benefits

4

   

Compensation and benefits explores the strategic importance of a well structured total compensation package in attracting, motivating and retaining key employees. The use of pay systems as a strategic tool for improving organizational effectiveness and the introduction and maintenance of a sound performance management system including performance appraisal methods and management training will be thoroughly discussed.  In addition, the financial, administrative and legal implications of benefit plans will be discussed.

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MGT 557

 

Employee Recruitment, Selection, and Retention

4

   

This course focuses on developing a strategic plan for providing an organization with the human resources needed to achieve corporate goals.  The plans, policies and procedures needed for short and long-range human resource planning, recruitment, selection and retention will be examined.  The importance of training and development in enhancing organizational effectiveness and employee retention will be explored.  In addition this course will look at the affects of layoffs, downsizing and employee separations on the morale of an organization.  (Prerequisite:  MGT555 and MGT556)

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MGT 560

 

Operations Management

4

 

 

 

 

Explores the dynamic nature of operations management concepts such as product/service design, capacity planning, facility locations, inventory systems, JIT production, supply chain management, and inbound/outbound logistics.  Analysis and solutions will be based on quantitative techniques such as linear programming, and inventory models.  Business simulations will give the students opportunities to apply their knowledge in solving operating problems.(Prerequisite: BUS501)

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MGT 570

 

Leadership Forum

4

 

 

 

 

Exploration of successful strategies for career advancement especially as these relate to women and minorities in the workplace.  The Leadership Forum objectives will be delivered through these sessions.  Through discussion with successful minority and business leaders, storytelling by guest speakers, cases, videos and sharing of their own experiences, students will gain a greater appreciation and understanding of, and sensitivity to, a much broader array of individuals and organizations.  Students will have the opportunity to meet role models and be encouraged to develop professional mentor/mentee relationships.  These sessions will be offered in formal and informal settings providing students with realistic corporate experiences.

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MGT 580

 

Contemporary Leadership

4
   

This leadership course examines some of the most pressing issues facing today's organizational leaders. Using a systems perspective, students will examine contextual and operational issues such as social responsibility, ethical climate, diversity, globalization, performance measures, and strategic planning that challenge today's leaders. Through extensive readings, discussions, individual and group projects, students will develop a comprehensive perspective of the complex leadership environment facing contemporary leaders and reflect on their own abilities for future success.

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MGT 590

 

Capstone: Competing Globally

4

 

 

 

 

A cross-disciplinary course that examines the challenges in formulating effective competitive strategy. Students will learn to anticipate industry changes when formulating and implementing strategy and balance the opportunities and risks associated with dynamic changes in industry.  Special emphasis will be placed on developing a strategic plan that focuses on industry analysis, strategic positioning, competitive dynamics, and global planning.  (Prerequisite:  Final Quarter)

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MGT 591

 

Contemporary Management Capstone

 
   

This is an interdisciplinary course consisting of a thorough examination of current management philosophies in today's environment.  The culmination of this course and the student's Master of Management degree experience is a portfolio of philosophies, case projects, and personal reflection along with a management structure for an organization in the student's concentration area.  The portfolio is presented and approved by a team of faculty, including the student's internship advisor, Dean, and Associate Dean of Graduate Studies.  (Prerequisite:  MGT585 or MGT586)

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MIS 510

 

Management Information Systems

4

 

 

 

 

Prepares students to identify information systems' needs and analyze the benefits of a successful information systems infrastructure from a manager's point of view. Students will identify and review business problems and processes that can be resolved and/or enhanced through the use of technology. The use of the decision support systems and what is involved in creating them will be explored. Students will learn how expert systems go beyond decision support by incorporating peoples' expertise and how artificial intelligence technologies help provide support previously obtained only through humans.

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MIS 515

 

Database Design and Management

4

 

 

 

 

Through the in-depth study of data semantics, graphics-based data modeling, relational algebra, the database language SQL, and normalization theory, students develop a solid and practical foundation for the design and implementation of relational database systems. Students will learn the practical applications of database technology: the acquisition, specification, and management of data. Advanced topics such as enterprise databases, database recovery, database security, and concurrency control issues will be discussed. Students will assess an organization's information and data availability to design and build a database that responds to business needs using current commercial database management system software.  (Prerequisite:  CIS500 or Dean's consent)

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MIS 517

 

Client/Server Development

4

 

 

 

 

This course focuses on the technologies and concepts used in client/server application development for web environments. Students will examine the architectural and functional decisions, technologies, configurations, languages, and techniques associated with client-server systems. Through hands-on experience in designing and managing a client-server development project, students will obtain advanaced skills for effective design and implementation of client/server applications.  (Prerequisite:  CIS500 or Dean's consent)

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MIS 520

 

Database Administration

4

 

 

 

 

Database administrators must understand how a database is used in order to effectively manage and maintain business resources, how database components interact with one another, and how issues of access affect the security and integrity of the database. Through hands-on practice, students will develop the skills needed to maintain, manage, and secure an effective and efficient database including performance monitoring, database security, user management, and backup/disaster recovery techniques.  (Prerequisite:  CIS500 or Dean's consent)

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MIS 521

 

IT Financial Management

4

 

 

This course introduces students to the basics of financial planning and budgeting for IT services. The course explores various strategies for costing IT services, outsourcing and managing vendors and suppliers. Topics include financial planning, budgeting, reporting, total cost of ownership, asset and expense management, and vendor and supplier management.

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MIS 525

 

Object-Oriented Programming

4

 

 

 

 

In this course, students will learn the process of developing a software product using the object-oriented approach. Through case studies and projects, students will understand the concepts of classes and objects, methods and message passing, inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation, and method overloading. The course will also introduce advanced programming constructs needed for the implementation of programming projects.  (Prerequisite:  CIS500 or Dean's consent)

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MIS 531

 

IT Service Management

4

   

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and terminology associated with IT service management.  Simulations will aid students in understanding how service management best practices help to align IT with business objectives.  Topics include a history of IT Service Management, current trends in the industry, an introduction to the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL), ISO 20000 and other standards and best practices in use by organizations today, and outsourcing and supplier/vendor management.

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MIS 540

 

Data Communication & Networking

4

 

 

 

 

The global use of computer networks allows unprecedented access to information and data communication. It is essential that IT professionals understand a variey of media, hardware, devices, portocols, and technologies used to share information. In this course, students will discuss topics such as local area networks, wide area networks, topologies, tranmissions media, and security. Special attention will be given to the most significant aspects of networking, such as the TCP/IP protocol suite, laying the groundwork for further courses in Network, Internet and Database security.  (Prerequisite:  CIS500 or Dean's consent)

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MIS 542

 

Network & Internet Security

4

 

 

 

 

This course provides the students with the theoretical and technical knowledge needed to design and implement an effective security strategy in a corporate network environment. Topics covered in this course include; firewalls, intrusion detection systems, authentication, cryptography, encryption, digital signatures, and key exchange. Students will learn how to enhance network security with cabling and network hardware, understand different types of firewalls, packet filtering and NAT, set up and secure virtual private networks, and understand hacker exploits.  (Prerequisite:  CIS500 or Dean's consent)

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MIS 544

 

Operating System & Database Security

4

 

 

 

 

Secure operating systems and databases are crucial to an organization's daily operations. In this course students will learn principles for defending operating systems including account and file system security. Assessing risk and reducing risk is not only an issue for the operating system but also for the database. To understand database protection concepts, students will discuss access control models for DBMSs, multilevel secure relational models, inference controls, and database encryption. The ethical considerations of data access and privacy will be addressed from an IT perspective.  (Prerequisite:  CIS500 or Dean's consent)

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MIS 548

 

Information Security Management

4

 

 

 

 

In this course, students will learn the requirements for planning, organizing, and managing information security in an organization. Students will be exposed to the spectrum of security activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures. Coverage will include inspection and protection of information assets, detection of and reaction to threats, examination of pre- and post-incident procedures, including technical and managerial responses. An overview of the information security planning and staffing functions will expose students to the security management lifecycle. Students will study managerial responsibilities including personal and organizational ethics, documentation, control and audit procedures, corporate security costs, and benefit identification.  (Prerequisite:  CIS500 or Dean's consent)

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MIS 560

 

Mobile Applications Design & Architecture

4

   

This course covers the basic theories, designs and engineering principles underlying mobile computing.  Topics include Mobile devices, Mobile Application Architectures, Mobile and Wireless Messaging, Mobile Security, Mobile information management, location based services and others.

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MIS 562

 

Legal Issues in Information Assurance & Auditing

4

   

 

This graduate course is a survey of legal issues arising under information security and control frameworks such as COBIT and IS017702. Topics include the basics of trademark, copyright, patent and trade secrets and protection strategies for each of them; software licensing issues; data privacy under state, federal and international law; evidence and digital forensic practices; ethics; the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act's boundaries for illegal access to computers; electronic surveillance and cyber traps; information security measures mandated by select federal statutes (HIPAA, Gramm-Leach-Bliley and Sarbanes-Oxley); and practical techniques on how to find and keep abreast of legal issues affecting information security.  (Prerequisite:  MIS542)

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MIS 565

 

Developing Mobile Web Applications

4

   

This course introduces the student to software mobile development. The course focuses on building mobile web applications while presenting the different components, options, Web design, and GUI design concepts a developer needs to know regarding mobile web development. Topics   include but not limited to CSS for mobile browsers, Mobile Rich Internet Applications, Mobile detection, geo-location and maps, Widgets and offline web apps.  (Prerequisite:  MIS517)

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MIS 572

 

Developing Mobile Native Applications

4

   

This course focuses on using specific programming language to create a mobile native application. Students will be introduced to the programming environment for a certain Mobile platform (ex. iPhone) and will have a hands-on approach to use the Software Development Kit (SDK) comes with the selected mobile platform. It also introduces students to key theories, concepts, issues, and the business model of the application packaging process and long with its online submission process. Students will be able to produce a functional application at the end of the course.  (Prerequisite:  MIS525)

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MIS 575

 

Ethical Hacking

4
   

This course focuses on developing techniques for attack detection and mitigation in enterprise networks. The course includes: traffic/log analysis, anomaly detection, intrusion prevention, adaptive security policy, alarm analysis, and worm contaminating and quarantining, performance evaluation of defense systems. Special emphasis will be giving to developing intelligent network defense systems. Thus, students must be prepared to do programming projects using any platform or programming language.  (Prerequisite:  MIS542)

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MIS 585

 

Special Topics in Mobile Development

4

   

In this course, students will be exposed to advanced topics in mobile computing such as location based services, M-Commerce, Wireless and Mobility and others. The topics reflect on the latest technologies available in the market.  In addition, student will be required to do a main project in this course that assesses their knowledge in mobile computing overall.  

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MIS 589

 

Business Continuity, Disaster Recovery Theories & Strategies

4

   

This course focuses on the knowledge necessary for an organization to prepare for a variety of major disruptions (floods, earthquakes, terrorist attacks, etc.). The goal is survival of the organization and its daily workflow despite major disruption. Students learn to analyze and prioritize risks and determine criticality ratings that are used to determine survival strategies. Students also learn how to organize employees to respond to a major disruption and how to document recovery plans. Course content includes coverage of current industry trends, as well as planning for the survival of Information Technology functions within an organization.  (Prerequisite:  MIS542)

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MIS 590

 

Capstone: Connecting Globally

4

 

 

 

 

In this integrative capstone course, students apply the knowledge gained in the courses of the MIS program. Students will collaborate to research, analyze, design, and document a complete IS system. Students will consult with local businesses to propose an IS design that meets the business's challenge. Students will meet with selected business's management to discuss their requirements and the students solutions. This real-world project will allow students to use their knowlege of databases, networking, information security, and management to facilitate global connections.  (Prerequisite:  CIS500 or Dean's consent)

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MKT 520

 

Marketing Management

4

 

 

 

 

Focuses on providing a framework that teaches students how to think about marketing as a process that creates value. The course will utilize the knowledge and skills of marketing, management, accounting, ethics, economics and finance.  Students will deal with marketing situations in diverse industries and marketing environments.  Marketing problems will be analyzed and resolved. Through case discussion, simulations, and team problem solving, students will experience the challenges and opportunities marketing managers encounter.

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PMP 575

 

Project Management

4

   

This survey course will focus on Project Integration Management  which identifies, defines, and describes the processes and activities that combine, unify and coordinate the various elements of project management. Project Integration Management is the roadmap for effectively implementing business strategies that span the entire organization. By using project management tools and techniques, students will learn how to overcome organizational barriers in order to achieve fully integrated, enterprise-wide project management success. (Prerequisite: BUS501)

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PRD580

 

Data Modeling and Intelligent Design

4

   

This course covers basic principles in data modeling and intelligent information. Students will learn the fundamentals of how big data can be converted into actionable insights to drive better business decisions. The course will include practical examples derived from business use cases reflecting current market trends. Emphasis will be placed more on the methodologies and less on the particular tools. The course syllabus is devised with a mixed audience in mind combining both the business oriented and the more technical analytical inclined. Topics covered in this course include big data, social intelligence, data warehousing, data aggregation, data preparation, basic analytics, data visualization and communication. (Prerequisite: MGT508)

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PRD585

 

Econometric Analysis

4

   

The focus of this course is on the development of analytical tools to support business decision making. Students will learn the basic steps involved in the formulation, parameterization, and use of econometric models. Topics will include regression analysis with cross sectional data (simple and multiple regression models, hetroskedasticity, autocorrelation, specification and data issues), panel data models, Instrumental variables estimation, simultaneous equation models, logit and probit models, and Poisson regression.(Prerequisite: PRD580)

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PRD590

 

Time Series Analysis

4

   

This course is an introduction to time series that emphasizes methods and analysis of data sets. The logic and tools of model-building for stationary and non-stationary time series are developed. Students will learn the latest methods in time series and forecasting, along with modern computational models and algorithms. (Prerequisite: PRD585)

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PRD600

 

Decision Modeling & Communication

4

   

This course is highly applied in nature and offers students the opportunity to work on integrating analytics in a corporate like setting to help improve the business. Students will select a project depicting a real scenario from different industries such as finance, healthcare, retail, government, marketing and sales. The class format and course syllabus are tailored for students to develop core skills applicable to business analytics in planning, project management, strategy development and implementation, team leadership, negotiations, decision making and presentation. Emphasis will be placed on how to effectively communicate final results to different audiences including non-technical audiences and senior management. Students will present their final projects in front of a mixed audience to make the case for their analytical findings, actionable insights, added value for the business, and gained competitive edge. (Prerequisite: PRD590)

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SPM 510

 

Sports Facility & Event Management

4

   

This course provides an overview of all procedures and functions necessary to plan, design, develop, and organize sport events and facilities. Topics include human resource management, risk management, financial consideration, marketing theory, and overall planning issues in the industry. Special emphasis will be placed on game-day organization and management. Experiential learning opportunities include site visits to various types of local sport and recreation facilities and events.

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SPM 520

 

Sport Media & Public Relations

4

   

Students will gain an understanding of the sports communications industry at both the collegiate and professional levels. The role of communication in the sports industry from a management perspective will be examined. Topics include news release writing, utilizing various forms of media, crisis management, pitching stories, interviewing techniques, and ethical issues.

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SPM 550

 

Intercollegiate Athletic Administration

4

   

This course focuses on the prevailing issues in college athletics including financial trends, legislation, conference realignment, reform, gender equity and other contemporary issues. Students will analyze the management structure of collegiate athletic departments reviewing organization structure in regard to NCAA and other athletic conferences.

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SPM 560

 

Legal & Liability Issues Affecting Sport Policy

4

   

This course provides an introductory examination of the legal and liability issues that commonly arise in the sport and recreation industry. Students will be introduced to the legal structures and standards as related to the field of Sports Management including recent precedents and mandates such as Title XI gender equity and policy affecting the recruitment, evaluations and personnel. Relevant legal cases and ethical dilemmas will be incorporated.

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SPM 585

 

Graduate Internship for Sports Administration

 
   

The Advanced Internship is a capstone experience intended to help students integrate coursework with the practice of administration and to reflect on their own development as professionals. Students work under the supervision of university faculty and a cooperating administrator at the internship site.

  (Prerequisite:  75% completion of Sports Administration specialization courses and Dean's approval, MM Sports Administration specialization only)

 
       
 
 

 

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Master of Business Administration

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Master of Information Systems

  • Information Security
  • Mobile Computing


Master of Management

  • Design & Media
  • Higher Education Administration
  • Health Care Administration
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  • Sports Administration

 

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Robert Morris University Illinois is a private, not-for-profit associate, baccalaureate, and master's degree-granting institution, accredited by the Higher learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (230 South LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois 60604, 312.263.0456). Robert Morris serves over 7000 students interested in getting an education that meets the demands of today's business, graphic arts, health care, culinary and technical world at its main campus in Chicago as well as at locations in Arlington Heights, DuPage, Elgin, Orland Park, Bensenville, Schaumburg, Springfield, Peoria and Lake County.